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Conducting Strong Performance Evaluations

Conducting Strong Performance Evaluations

By Alison Green | HRPeople

August 31, 2009

I’m embarrassed to admit that this is the first year I’m giving our managers detailed training on how to conduct good performance reviews. In the past, I’ve sent them forms to use and a few words of encouragement, and not much else. In retrospect, this was a crazy plan, since most people haven’t done many of these in their careers and people have different ideas about how to go about them.

So this year I’m doing a group training for managers. In addition to talking about the specifics of our forms, especially the nuances of our rating categories, I’m also going to cover the following:

1. Why do we do performance appraisals when our goal is to be giving feedback on a regular, ongoing basis through the year? Answer: To provide a substantive, overall assessment of employees’ performance and ensure the manager and employee are on the same page; to provide suggestions for growth and improvement, helping fair performers become good and good performers become great; to provide an opportunity to delegate more responsibility to the employee; to find out how the employee is doing internally – happy, thinking of leaving in the next year, wanting more responsibility, etc.; and in the case of poor performers, to send (additional) clear messages about needed improvements and to supplement documentation in the event termination becomes necessary.

2. How long should a manager expect to spend on the process? Answer: Plan to allow at least an hour to write each appraisal, if not more, and allow another hour to meet with each employee individually. And no matter how tempting procrastination may be, don’t put it off, since it sends a terrible message to the employee when their evaluation is delayed and delayed.

3. Be specific and use examples to illustrate your points, both when praising and when identifying areas for improvement. For instance, you could say “you did a great job with the new inventory system,” but it’s more effective to say “your revamping of the inventory system has saved the company money and I’ve heard several people comment about how much easier you’ve made it to find the supplies they need.”

4. Be honest and direct about problem areas. If you have any complaints/concerns, they must be included. Potentially uncomfortable, yes, but it’s also your obligation as a manager. (And if you ever find yourself needing to defend a firing in court, you’ll be in real trouble if the plaintiff’s performance reviews were misleadingly positive.)


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