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Network and Computer Systems Administrators

HRPeople with O*Net and Payscale

Tasks

Diagnose hardware and software problems, and replace defective components.

Perform data backups and disaster recovery operations.

Maintain and administer computer networks and related computing environments including computer hardware, systems software, applications software, and all configurations.

Plan, coordinate, and implement network security measures to protect data, software, and hardware.

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Operate master consoles to monitor the performance of computer systems and networks, and to coordinate computer network access and use.

Perform routine network startup and shutdown procedures, and maintain control records.

Design, configure, and test computer hardware, networking software and operating system software.

Recommend changes to improve systems and network configurations, and determine hardware or software requirements related to such changes.

Confer with network users about how to solve existing system problems.

Monitor network performance to determine whether adjustments need to be made, and to determine where changes will need to be made in the future.

Knowledge

Computers and Electronics — Knowledge of circuit boards, processors, chips, electronic equipment, and computer hardware and software, including applications and programming.

Customer and Personal Service — Knowledge of principles and processes for providing customer and personal services. This includes customer needs assessment, meeting quality standards for services, and evaluation of customer satisfaction.

Telecommunications — Knowledge of transmission, broadcasting, switching, control, and operation of telecommunications systems.

English Language — Knowledge of the structure and content of the English language including the meaning and spelling of words, rules of composition, and grammar.

Education and Training — Knowledge of principles and methods for curriculum and training design, teaching and instruction for individuals and groups, and the measurement of training effects.

Engineering and Technology — Knowledge of the practical application of engineering science and technology. This includes applying principles, techniques, procedures, and equipment to the design and production of various goods and services.

Administration and Management — Knowledge of business and management principles involved in strategic planning, resource allocation, human resources modeling, leadership technique, production methods, and coordination of people and resources.

Mathematics — Knowledge of arithmetic, algebra, geometry, calculus, statistics, and their applications.

Skills

Reading Comprehension — Understanding written sentences and paragraphs in work related documents.

Troubleshooting — Determining causes of operating errors and deciding what to do about it.

Active Listening — Giving full attention to what other people are saying, taking time to understand the points being made, asking questions as appropriate, and not interrupting at inappropriate times.

Active Learning — Understanding the implications of new information for both current and future problem-solving and decision-making.

Complex Problem Solving — Identifying complex problems and reviewing related information to develop and evaluate options and implement solutions.

Critical Thinking — Using logic and reasoning to identify the strengths and weaknesses of alternative solutions, conclusions or approaches to problems.

Service Orientation — Actively looking for ways to help people.

Coordination — Adjusting actions in relation to others’ actions.

Equipment Selection — Determining the kind of tools and equipment needed to do a job.

Installation — Installing equipment, machines, wiring, or programs to meet specifications.

Abilities

Near Vision — The ability to see details at close range (within a few feet of the observer).

Problem Sensitivity — The ability to tell when something is wrong or is likely to go wrong. It does not involve solving the problem, only recognizing there is a problem.

Inductive Reasoning — The ability to combine pieces of information to form general rules or conclusions (includes finding a relationship among seemingly unrelated events).

Oral Comprehension — The ability to listen to and understand information and ideas presented through spoken words and sentences.

Deductive Reasoning — The ability to apply general rules to specific problems to produce answers that make sense.

Information Ordering — The ability to arrange things or actions in a certain order or pattern according to a specific rule or set of rules (e.g., patterns of numbers, letters, words, pictures, mathematical operations).

Oral Expression — The ability to communicate information and ideas in speaking so others will understand.

Written Comprehension — The ability to read and understand information and ideas presented in writing.

Finger Dexterity — The ability to make precisely coordinated movements of the fingers of one or both hands to grasp, manipulate, or assemble very small objects.

Flexibility of Closure — The ability to identify or detect a known pattern (a figure, object, word, or sound) that is hidden in other distracting material.

Tasks, KSAs sourced from O*Net

Pay






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