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Seven First-Time Resume Concerns

Seven First-Time Resume Concerns

Peter Vogt | Monster Senior Contributing Writer

August 06, 2008

When you’re a college student or recent grad and trying to write a resume, especially your first one, you’ll face questions you typically won’t find addressed in the current blizzard of resume books. That doesn’t mean your questions aren’t valid; it simply means the resume experts often overlook them, because they generally target mid-career audiences.

As The MonsterTRAK Career Coach, I’ve seen many versions of the following resume-related questions. It’s time for some answers.

1. Should My Resume Be One Page or Two?

If you read enough books or talk to enough people who “know” about resumes, you’ll come across a rule stating your resume should be only one page long. It’s time to let this myth go, along with the resume handcuffing it spawns.

It’s great if you can do this. But if you end up leaving out so much good material that you destroy your interview chances, what good have you done?

Remember: A human will read your resume. Some readers demand your resume be one page. Others will read a two-pager without hesitation. You don’t know who’s who, but the point still remains –- a one-page rule simply doesn’t exist.

2. Should the Education Section Go First or Last?

In most cases, it makes sense to put the Education section at the beginning of your resume, since you’re a college student or recent grad. But if you’ve got a lot of great internship, co-op or work experience closely related to your chosen field, position your Experience section ahead of Education.

Here’s another resume area where there’s no rule: Put it where it makes the most sense for you and your particular skills and experiences.



Poll: How do you feel about crying at work?

Poll: How do you feel about crying at work?